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At the European Parliament: Domestic violence against people with disability

 

2 semi circles of seated people facing each other with one woman in a bed chair lying down and man with hat at this end and interpreters signing in space between the semi circles

Photo of meeting from European Parliament Anti-Racism and Diversity Intergroup. http://www.ardi-ep.eu 

Sisters of Frida was asked to speak at an event hosted by Soraya Post MEP on Domestic violence against disabled people by the European Network of Independent Living (ENIL) on the 31st January 2017. Here is the speech from Eleanor Lisney ( a summarised version was given as the meeting ran out of time)

Having support for independent living is one of the fundamental needs of disabled people and the structural barriers of being able to exercise our rights is in our battles with social services, schools, higher education, housing, stigmas and discrimination and ableism.
four women around a table, 2 wheelchair users, one with Middle Eastern, one with East Asian looks, the other Caucasian with one in a bed chair lying down position.

with Nadia (ENIL), Eleanor (SOF), Freyja and Embla (Tabú)

It seems right that we should meet with ENIL member before the event  – Nadia Haddad and Tabú ‘s Embla Ágústsdóttir and Freyja Haraldsdóttir for drinks to talk before the event.

Embla and Freyja were giving their testimonies on behalf of  the next day on domestic violence against disabled people. Here is their speech for Tabú.

It is clear that a new definition of domestic violence in itself will not solve the social situation of disabled women and end domestic violence against us. That does not change the fact that by redefining domestic violence legally and in policy can change, for the better, the practices of the police, legal system, social services and violence support networks. Changing the definition does not have to shadow the gender-based approach, it should enrich it. This should not have to exclude tackling of other forms of violence, e.g. institutional violence and hate crime. More so it could draw upon the multiple and concurrent forms of violence that should be beneficial to disabled women and service systems. It could deepen the understanding of which kind of violence affects or actuate other kinds of violence as well as offering a better ground to analyse how structures and cultures encourage and minimize abuse in the lives of disabled women.”

 

We also met up with all four of the Disabled Survivors Unite co-founders from the UK – Alice Kirkby, Ashley Stephens, Holly Scott-Gardner and  Bekki Smiddy. Here is their blog of the day with a audio recording and transcript. There was much appreciation of their testimonies.

John Pring of Disability News Service wrote the article  ‘Cuts mean government ‘is complicit in high levels of domestic violence’ on their appearance.

Ana Peláez, the Chair of the European Disability Forum (EDF) Women’s Committee and a member of its Executive Committee spoke on the structual problems faced by disabled women and girls

So the first thing we need to say is that violence against women and girls with disabilities is structural violence that arises from the mere fact that when we talk about their specific situation they are not recognised as women or girls. This non-recognition means they are excluded from policies aimed at providing assistance and recovery for women victims of violence. (Another related topic is the accessibility of these services, but today we don’t have time to go into this.)

A second structural aspect of violence against women and girls with disabilities is that in many cases they are victims of legal incapacitation which takes place due to their gender. This incapacitation is part of the process to enable these women to be subjected to forced sterilisation without their consent, or without their realising what is being done to them. This practise is another type of domestic violence in some ways, because it is the families who, in violation of the CRPD and even article 39 of the Istanbul Convention, choose to sterilise their daughters to protect them against unwanted pregnancies. I don’t mean to blame the families; they are also victims of the healthcare system, which very often suggests this type of practise. Sterilising a woman means mutilating not only her reproductive capacity, but also her civil, political and economic rights. In addition, the only thing sterilisation achieves is to leave girls and women with disabilities even more exposed to sexual abuse and rape. Even worse, they are also unable to access justice to report the perpetrators or seek remedies, because they have been deprived of their legal capacity.

Here is the Ana Peláez EP  (Word doc) speech in full that she kindly send us.

 

It was wonderful to meet Madelen Löw from We Rise Again (Sweden) who spoke her powerful testimony

two women, one speaking, the other woman is listening

Madelen Löw with Judith Ward UK MEP

People who were involved with the event spoke of their willingness to have further collaboration on the topic – we hope so! We will continue to follow the discussions. There was much mention of the Istanbul Convention that we hope will be ratified soon by the UK.

More photos from the event at Flickr account

Joining the Women’s March London Saturday 21st January

Sisters of Frida are happy to march with the  Women Equality Party on Saturday. they are supporting us including helping with access needs so that we are able to march together.

They will have volunteers ready to support people with access needs on the day. If you need to contact us here is the mobile number you can contact 07453528706 – it might be better to text.

you can also contact us through twitter @sisofrida

see the access information provided by the organisers

And from the WEP

Getting there and getting away

  • Roads will be closed from noon to 17:00, so we suggest that you plan for delays if you are expecting to rely on buses or taxis
  • If you are traveling by tube please be advised that Green Park is the only nearby station that is fully accessible.  If buses are off this may mean you need to make your own way to Green Park tube station, which is slightly under a mile from Trafalgar Square
  • Please note that the Jubilee line will be closed on the day.

Buses (likely to be disrupted between 12noon and 5pm)

  • To reach Grosvenor Square (stops along Oxford Street near Bond Street Station): 6,7,10,13,23,73,94,98,137,139,159,189,390
  • To reach Park Lane: 2,10,16,36,73,74,82,137,148,414,436
  • To reach Green Park (stops along Piccadilly): C2,9,14,19,22,38

At the start

WE volunteers will be located at both drop-off points and can help guide you to the starting points, and we will also have a volunteer who can accompany you on the shorter march route if you wish

If you think you might need support, please make yourself known to a WE volunteer before the start.  We will be wearing a WE logo card on a lanyard so that you can identify us

During the march

Our volunteers on hand to help if you need any support and people at the back of our block looking out for anyone who needs some help

If you would like someone to buddy you on the march, just let us know.

(But check TFL travel alerts ,TFL, and TFL bus alerts )

And if you’re unable to march on Saturday? 

Join the livestreaming on the day  provided by Obi. WEP will also be livestreaming. Check their twitter feed too @WEP_UK

Changing Places toilets 

Not sure you can get into the Houses of Parliament on a Saturday to use the toilet.

Marchers taking the shorter route from Pall Mall

There is a shorter route joining the march from Pall Mall, and you are welcome to join the WE/Sisters of Frida block from this point. There will be a WE/Sisters of Frida point person at Pall Mall with a banner. The organisers have let us know that there are drop off points for people joining the march on Pall Mall from the north, at the bottom of Regent Street; from the south, Waterloo Place. There will be access stewards with green placards here. It is recommended that you arrive by 1.20pm to join the procession.

We hope you will join us – bring your family, childen, pets,  friends, PAs, support workers. We might not be many but we will be seen. But please self care is important, we totally understand if you cannot join the march.

Send us your photo – a very short message and we will tweet it during the march! on twitter or to hello@sisofrida.org

 

 

 

Submission to the Human Rights Council’s Universal Periodic Review (UPR)

Sisters of Frida with the Women Enabled International provided evidence to the United Nations Universal Periodic Review of Human Rights of the United Kingdom. We focused on disabled women and specifically on violence against disabled women and domestic abuse.

You can find the report at UPR submission PDF and UPR Submission .doc

A Dialogue: Survivors in a disabling environment: what does empowerment of disabled women mean globally?

Venue CCUN Chapel 12.30-2pm (ground floor) Enter by the far door not the side with elevators. The shape of the room (chapel) might prove a challenge for a formal set up.

This panel will be discussing what would empowerment of disabled women mean locally, nationally and globally. We will try to include voices of disabled women (short video clips) from different parts of the world stating what it means to them if its possible with the venue. We will post the clips online for later viewing if not. We will use the Social Model of Disability; that is to say it is systemic barriers, negative attitudes and exclusion by society (purposely or inadvertently), that disable us. We will also look at the different nuances of violence against disabled women, the different forms of abuse and how disabled women in particular are affected. How they survive inspite of having to face numerous challenges/barriers wherever they are in the world.
Speakers
Alexia Manombe-Ncube (Naimbia)
Alexia is the Deputy Minister of Disability Affairs in the office of Vice President, Namibia. Recently appointed by President Hage Geingob to handle the affairs of physically challenged people, Manombe-Ncube has appealed to stakeholders to highlight the plight of the country’s disabled people in order for her to realise her ministerial declaration of intent. She also urged stakeholders to apply all their energy towards the empowerment and development of the disabled and specifically to close the gender equality gap.
She champions those in the rural areas saying disabled are have less resources and left to crawl because they do not have wheelchairs like people in the cities. Alexia will be speaking on the status of disabled in Naimbia and her own empowerment as a minister.
Lucia Bellini (UK)
Lucia currently works as an advocate for disabled people who are victims of domestic violence. She is also a Disability Rights Advocate where she assists people to access care packages, to be re-housed, to apply for benefits and to appeal against decisions they are not happy with. She has a masters in Global Citizenship, Identity and Human Rights from the University of Nottingham. In 2008 to 2010, she worked with disabled people’s organisations in Guyana where she provided disability equality and project management training to many disabled people throughout the country. She is particularly passionate about ensuring disabled women feel empowered and equipped to make their own choices. Lucia will be speaking about disabled women caught up in domestic violence in the UK.
Michelle Baharier (UK)
Michelle (UK) is a visual artist and disabled activist with lived experience of mental-distress for over three decades. She set up and ran a disabled lead arts organisation changing the way disabled people were perceived in the main stream.
She has worked with women’s organisations and on a telephone help line for women affected by violence, and with women from a variety of cultures including the Poppy Project which supports women who have been trafficked to the UK, the Diane project for Iranian women who need a safe place to be due to violence. Michelle will speak about her work with mental health survivors and their struggle for empowerment.
Suzannah Phillips (USA)
Suzannah is the Legal Advisor for Women Enabled International. Her work focuses on legal advocacy with the United Nations and other international and regional forums to strengthen human rights standards on the rights of women and girls with disabilities. Prior to joining WEI, Suzannah was the International Women’s Human Rights Clinical Fellow at CUNY School of Law, Legal Adviser for International Advocacy at the Center for Reproductive Rights (CRR), and a Human Rights Fellow with VIVO POSITIVO in Santiago, Chile. She is currently a member of the International Human Rights Committee at the New York City Bar Association. Suzannah received her J.D. from Columbia Law School and her B.A. in Social Anthropology from Harvard University. Suzannah will be speaking on how different legal instruments can be used to support empowerment of disabled women especially with Women Enabled International’s work.
Eleanor Lisney (UK)
Eleanor is born Malaysian Chinese of immigrant parents who moved to UK herself for graduate study. She is a founding member of Sisters of Frida will facilitate the meeting.
We will have time to discuss some action points that could lead us to unite across the world in solidarity and in sisterhood.
http://www.sisofrida.org/ email hello@sisofrida.org @sisofrida

Privacy Notice

Sisters of Frida CIC is a company incorporated in England and Wales with registered number 09130114 whose registered office is WRC United House, North Road, London, N7 9DP (“SOF”).

SOF is responsible for www.sisofrida.org and www.facebook.com/sistersoffrida (our “Websites”).

Please read this notice carefully. Your use of our Websites signifies your agreement and consent to this notice. If not, please discontinue your use immediately.

This notice describes the type of personal data we collect and how we may use and share that data. The term “personal data” means information about an identifiable individual which includes name, address, email, telephone number and other information relating specifically to an individual.

 How We Share Personal Data

 We never sell or otherwise share your personal data, subject to two specific exceptions:

  • We may share your personal data with service providers, employees or contractors (paid or unpaid) that we have retained to perform services or work on our behalf. They are provided only with the personal data they need to perform their functions and can only use and disclose such personal data as is necessary to perform services on our behalf or to comply with legal requirements.
  • In addition, we may disclose your personal data (i) if we are required to do so by law or legal process, (ii) to law enforcement authorities or other government officials, or (iii) when we believe disclosure is necessary or appropriate to prevent physical harm or financial loss or in connection with an investigation of suspected or actual illegal activity.

Why do we collect data?

SOF is a not-for-profit company which was established as a community interest company (CIC) with a Steering Group. We want a new way of sharing experiences, mutual support and relationships. We send out electronic communications to and for the benefit of self-identified disabled and allied women to promote opportunities and seek feedback on initiatives and activities.

What we collect

We may collect the following information:

  • name
  • contact information including email address
  • demographic information such as postcode, preferences and interests
  • other information relevant to surveys, offers and/or events.

You may provide personal data when you attend one of our events, visit our Websites, contact us and respond to research/surveys. If you choose not to provide us with your personal data you may not be able to access some of the opportunities we facilitate (eg free workshops) or information we share (eg government consultations).

If you communicate with us through any link on our Websites, we may ask you for your personal data so we can respond to your questions and comments.

Newsletters And Other Communications

On our Websites (or otherwise following direct communication with us) we may sign you up to receive our newsletters and other communications. Your personal data is used by us to send you those communications. Details of how you may opt-out of receiving some or all communications from us are described in the “Your Preferences” section below.

Events

 When you book onto and/or attend one of our events we may collect your personal data and record your interest/attendance in that event. Given the need for us to demonstrate value for money from our funders, it’s important for us to demonstrate consultation and engagement with disabled and allied women. We never disclose the names/contact details of anyone who attends our events.

Other Data We May Collect Automatically

 When you visit our Websites, we may automatically collect certain personal data that we then aggregate so that it is not linked to a single, identifiable individual. This information provides us with statistics such as how many users visited our site and which pages were accessed. By collecting this information, we learn how to best tailor our Websites. We may collect this information either through “log files”, “cookie” technology or with “web beacons”, as explained below.

Log Files

Log files are web server files (such as the domain name or IP address, URL, the http response code, the Website from where you visit us or the date and duration of your visit) that are automatically created when an Internet user visits a site. Once you stop using our Websites, we process and use this information only to enable further connections, for billing purposes, to detect disruptions to telecommunication equipment and to detect abuse of our telecommunication services.

This information is used to create general aggregated profiles of our Websites’ user base and is not used to create personalised user profiles. In case of disruption or misuse, we reserve the right to file a report with law enforcement agencies. We do not use this information for any other purpose(s) and do not share this information with any third parties, except as set out in the section titled “How We Share Personal Data” below.

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Like many organisations, we use “cookies” or similar objects on our Websites. Cookies are bits of text that are placed on your computer’s hard drive when you visit certain websites. We use cookies to tell us, for example, whether you have visited our Websites before or if you are a new visitor and to help us identify site features in which you may have the greatest interest. Cookies may enhance your online experience, for example, by remembering your passwords and viewing preferences, while you are visiting a particular site.

The majority of browsers are initially set up to accept cookies. The toolbar on most browsers will have a feature to tell you how to stop accepting new cookies, how to receive notification of new cookies, and how to disable any existing cookies. Please note, however, if you do disable, reject or stop cookies, you may not be able to take full advantage of all our Websites’ features and services we would like to offer you.

Web Beacons

Certain pages on our Websites may contain “web beacons” (also known as Internet tags, pixel tags and clear GIFs). These web beacons allow third parties to obtain information such as the IP address of the computer that downloaded the page on which the beacon appears, the URL of the page on which the beacon appears, the time the page containing the beacon was viewed, the type of browser used to view the page, and the information in cookies sent by the third party.

Where Your Personal Data May Be Transferred Or Stored

Your personal data will be processed in the United Kingdom and/or in other states of the European Economic Area (EEA). SOF has taken reasonable steps so that personal data it collects receives an appropriate level of data protection.

Links To Other Websites

Our website may contain links to other websites of interest. However, once you have used these links to leave our site, you should note that we do not have any control over that other website. Therefore, we cannot be responsible for the protection and privacy of any information which you provide whilst visiting such sites and such sites are not governed by this privacy statement. You should exercise caution and look at the privacy statement applicable to the website in question.

How We Protect Your Personal Data

We maintain administrative, technical and physical safeguards to protect against loss, misuse or unauthorised access, disclosure, alteration or destruction of the personal data you provide to SOF.

Access And Correction

You may request details of personal information which we hold about you under the Data Protection Act 1998. A small fee will be payable. If you would like a copy of the information held on you please email hello@sisofrida.org. If you believe that any information we are holding on you is incorrect or incomplete, please email us as soon as possible and we will promptly correct any information found to be incorrect.

Your Preferences

 If you would like to update your contact details and preferences, or to tell us you no longer want us to process your personal data, you may email us at hello@sisofrida.org.

If you ask that we stop using your personal data, we take reasonable steps and honour that request. However, we will retain records of your personal data as needed in order to comply with applicable law.

Updates To Our Privacy Notice

 We may change this policy from time to time by updating this page. You should check this page from time to time to ensure that you are happy with any changes.

How To Contact Us

If you have any questions or comments about this Notice, or if you would like us to update the personal data we have about you or your preferences, please contact us by sending an email to hello@sisofrida.org or use the contact us form

Last updated: 2 March 16

Sisters of Frida at the WoW Festival 2016!

 

Women of the World festival logo

We are really excited that many Sisters of Frida will be speaking at the WoW Festival 2016. At the moment we can confirm

Saturday 12th 11.30 -12.30

Coming Out as Disabled: Body Image, Labels and Denial of Disability

One in five of us is disabled – so why do so many women try to hide their disabilities?

Zara Todd, Debs Williams, Rebecca Bunce and Dyi Hudjg

Saturday afternoon with Sarah Rennie in

Toilets are a Feminist Issue

Ever been frustrated by the queue for the ladies’? Come and hear about how you can judge the gender equality of a nation by the state of its toilets. Led by the doyenne of toilet politics, Professor Clara Greed.

Sunday 13th 1.15-2.15, Pauline Latchem

‘Chore wars & domestic lives‘ –

this session is about the male/female split of domestic labour and whether or not this is one of the last frontiers of gender inequality.

Tickets can be bought online

Khairani Barokka:poet/disability & arts advocate at Bare Lit Festival 2016!

Okka

Khairani Barokka

We met the lovely poet and disability and arts (self-)advocate Khairani Barokka who came to our AGM. We are delighted that she will be at the Bare Lit Festival 2016  Panel:

Second Generation Poets in Exile.

We wish her all the best!! and hope a few of us will manage to get to see her there at the Free Word Centre 60 Farringdon Road London, EC1R 3GB which is accessible!

Okka’s bio

Khairani Barokka (b. 1985) is a writer, poet, and interdisciplinary artist. She is also a practitioner of think/do advocacy in the arts, particularly on the ways in which innovation in storytelling can increase inclusion and access for and by disability cultures and feminisms (both of which she is happy to be a part of). Born in Jakarta, Okka works, teaches, and is published internationally, in print and online (see WRITING for recently published and forthcoming work). Her lectures, performances, workshops, and/or projects have been presented extensively, in India, the US, Australia, Malaysia, the UK, Austria, Germany, Singapore, and her native Indonesia. She has a masters from ITP at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, as a Tisch Departmental Fellow, working on participatory, interactive art, literature, and social issues storytelling. Her BA (High Honors, College Scholar) was from Middlebury College in Sociology/Anthropology.

 

Okka is the writer, performer, and producer of a hearing-impaired accessible solo show, “Eve and Mary Are Having Coffee” (with a grant from HIVOS as main sponsor), which premiered at Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2014 as Indonesia’s only representative. Previously, she pioneered the production of the first live-streamed spoken word shows in Indonesia, involving cross-national collaborations, with a focus on social justice/disability justice. As an independent scholar, she is a member of the International Federation for Theatre Research (IFTR), and has presented at international conferences, festivals, and as a two-time TEDx speaker (Jakarta and Youth@Chennai). Okka was profiled in UNFPA’s book “Investing in Young People in Indonesia: Inspirational Young Leaders Driving Social Change” (2014) for raising awareness of disability issues and perspectives through art and writing. She has also been featured widely in national and international media, among them multiple ABC Australia appearances (radio and television), RRR (Aus), The Hindu (India), The Times of India, The New Current (UK), and all major Indonesian newspapers and media including National Geographic, Esquire, and BBC Indonesia (see PRESS for complete list).

 

Okka was most recently Artist-In-Residence at Rimbun Dahan (Malaysia, 2014-15) for 6 months, where she worked on writing projects as well as using text in mixed media works. She has also held residencies at Vermont Studio Center (US, 2011; with a grant for poetry, as first Indonesian writer-in-residence), Tutti Arts (AUS, 2013), the EQUILIBRIUM Project at Sandarbh (India, 2014), Jatiwangi Art Factory’s Village Video Festival (Indonesia, 2012) and was Emerging Writers Festival’s (AUS) Inaugural International Writer-In-Residence for 2013.

 

Her first book as sole author, a poetry-Braille-art production entitled “Indigenous Species” (also to be made available in non-Braille versions), will be out in late 2016 with Tilted Axis Press (UK). “HEAT”, an anthology of Southeast Asian urban writing co-edited with Ng Yi-Sheng for Buku Fixi Publishing (Malaysia), will be launched at the London Book Fair in 2016. In September 2015, Okka began a PhD by practice in Goldsmiths’ Visual Cultures Department, on an LPDP Doctoral Scholarship. She continues her work at the intersections of writing, art, disability cultures and participatory narratives with a long-awaited project–it’s been given the enticing codename “Project A”, as lacklustre codenames are significantly underrated as a method of approaching secret missions.

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